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Thread: Are there any Arawak or Carib Indians in Jamaica presently?

  1. #1

    Default Are there any Arawak or Carib Indians in Jamaica presently?

    I was watching a program about endangered sea turtles that get killed for food and to make trinkets along the coast of some central or south American country (actually I am not really sure which country, just that it was in this hemisphere.)
    The people were doing it to sustain themselves, but the surprising thing to me is that they where Arawak indians.
    I didn't know they still had Arawaks Indians living today, I assumed they were all killed by Christopher Columbus and Co.

    Does and know if there are any descendants of Arawaks still living in JA?

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    If there are, they are very minimal...there may be more Caribs than Arawaks (the Arawaks were prone to infections, so they were pretty much wiped out in JA).
    "Big Cats Are Dangerous, But A Little Pussy Won't Hurt"



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    There are a few, Columbus didn't manage to wipe out all of the over 1 million Arawaks but most of them mixed up in the Jamaican culture stew right now...so there's probably no full blooded ones left, then again...

    Also when I was a yute I used to think coolie people were Arawaks until somebody told me they came from India...
    11:11-knowledge isn't filling a cup it's lighting a fire

    bun di wolf an di leopard

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    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Menke
    There are a few, Columbus didn't manage to wipe out all of the over 1 million Arawaks but most of them mixed up in the Jamaican culture stew right now...so there's probably no full blooded ones left, then again...

    Also when I was a yute I used to think coolie people were Arawaks until somebody told me they came from India...

    Dis ah Puppah Cadbury Man blessed, youth that word "Coolie" you should refrain from using that word when referring to a group of people of indian origin, the word is a disgusting insult if you know the true meaning. Jah know how we as black people get when smaddy call we the "N" word ah de samething. Dis ah Puppah Cadbury Man blessed.

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    Stop chat fart my yute cause mi a half coolie, my mother is full coolie...I never seen a coolie get offended because he was called a coolie before, in fact coolie people call each other coolie...I know the origins of the word coolie, my mother told me it had something to do with coolie people doing the work of neaga people after slavery or something, but who gives a fuck...and please learn to type my yute...
    11:11-knowledge isn't filling a cup it's lighting a fire

    bun di wolf an di leopard

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    Quote Originally Posted by Menke
    Stop chat fart my yute cause mi a half coolie, my mother is full coolie...I never seen a coolie get offended because he was called a coolie before, in fact coolie people call each other coolie...I know the origins of the word coolie, my mother told me it had something to do with coolie people doing the work of neaga people after slavery or something, but who gives a fuck...and please learn to type my yute...

    Dis ah Puppah Cadbury Man first of all let's pick sense out ah nonsense. Meinke Man I dont know how much mufflers you inhaled but Cadbury Man old enough to be "yuh fadda" and I'm not your youth. If I need to learn how to type, then you need to learn how to read cause you can't spell.

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    Please log the fuck off crackhead...you would be good for a laugh if I was a retard but you're juss plain annoying...what kinda grown man who could be my father walk around saying "dis a pupah cadbury man blessed" fold the fuck up pussy
    11:11-knowledge isn't filling a cup it's lighting a fire

    bun di wolf an di leopard

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    Quote Originally Posted by Menke
    you would be good for a laugh if I was a retard fold the fuck up pussy

    People this is what happens when youths grow in a home without a father.

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    ---ZyE--- is offline Member needs to UPDATE email info or CONFIRM email address
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    nuff a dem mix up wit di Maroons dem...yuh can count pan you hand di pure ones

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    Default re: "coolie"

    Rampage have a point...but Menke deh right too..

    from back inna di day di name "coolie" was like di word "Nigger"..real disrespect
    but afta time pass di imported East Indian descendants dem get de-sensitize to it..
    juss like now, every black man & dem little children call each other "nigga"


    "people without a past is like a tree with out roots"..."know thyself"

  12. #12

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    mek mi kick some knowledge gi unnuh..

    Taíno Indian culture was the most highly developed in the Caribbean, when Columbus reached Hispaniola in 1492. Islands throughout the Greater Antilles were dotted with Taíno communities nestled in valleys and along the rivers and coastlines, some of which were inhabited by thousands of people. The first New World society that Columbus encountered was one of tremendous creativity and energy. The Taíno had an extraordinary repertoire of expressive forms in sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, weaving, dance, music, and poetry. Their inventiveness and dynamics were also reflected in their social hierarchies and political organization.

    The Tainos rebelled

    At their arrival the Spaniards expected the Taino Indians to acknowledge the sovereignty of the king of Spain by payment of gold tribute, to work and supply provisions of food and to observe Christian ways. The Taínos rebelled most notably in 1511, when several caciques (Taíno leaders) conspired to oust the Spaniards. They were joined in this uprising by their traditional enemies, the Caribs. Their weapons, however, were no match against Spanish horses and firearms and the revolt was soon ended brutally by the Spanish forces.

    Personal possessions

    The Taino's complexion were bronze-coloured, average stature, dark, flowing, coarse hair, and large and slightly oblique dark eyes. Men generally went naked or wore a breech cloth, called nagua, single women walked around naked and married women an apron to over their genitals, made of cotton or palm fibers. The length of which was a sign of rank. Both sexes painted themselves on special occasions; they wore earrings, nose rings, and necklaces, which were sometimes made of gold.
    Their personal possessions consisted of wooden stools with four legs and carved backs, hammocks made of cotton cloth or string for sleeping, clay and wooden bowls for mixing and serving food, calabashes or gourds for drinking water and bailing out boats, and their most prized possessions, large dugout canoes, for transportation, fishing, and water sports.

    Caciques - The shiefs

    Taíno society was divided into two classes (similar to Arawak Indian classes) - nobles (nitaínos) and commoners (naborias) - governed by a hierarchy of greater and lesser chiefs known as caciques. The Cacicazgos controlled by caciques were confederations of communities with populations that ranged from several hundred, to thousands of people. Although male caciques ruled Taíno society, they inherited the right to rule from female relatives, some of whom were cacicas (chiefs) themselves.
    As Taíno society developed from A.D. 1200 to 1500, powerful caciques united these federations into political states. At the time of the conquest, Hispaniola was under the control of five important caciques. Puerto Rico was governed by approximately twenty.

    Female artists

    Women played a significant role in Taíno culture as artists. They wove costumes and hammocks, made ceramic vessels for food preparation, and commissioned and owned duhos, the ceremonial seats used by caciques, nobles, and shamans. Duhos were often carved in human or animal form and had elaborately incised designs. The material was wood or stone and were highly polished and embellished with incrustations of gold, shell, and bone. Prestige and power were intimately linked to the ownership and use of these seats. They were made with high backs or low backs, including some that are flat seats. Caciques using only high-backed duhos. Other members of the nobility and shamans probably used low-backed duhos.
    About one hundred duhos are known today; most were discovered in caves, where they were either buried with the deceased or hidden from the Spanish.



    Jewelry and ornaments

    Caciques were polygamous, and formed political alliances by marrying women from other cacicazgos. They controlled the collection and distribution of food and trade goods. They organized community festivals known as areytos; and they decided when to go to war.
    Caciques and nitaínos (noble) were further distinguished by their clothing, jewelry, and other accessories. They wore garments of the finest woven cotton and beaded belts with geometric designs. For important occasions they donned capes made from the colourful plumage of tropical birds: parrots, toucans, herons, and eagles. They also wore beautifully worked shell jewelry - including necklaces and pectoral ornaments - and amulets made from gold, beautiful stones and bones.

    The Tainos exploited the nature

    The Taíno exploited their natural resources, and developed efficient techniques of agriculture, hunting, and fishing. Naborias - the common people - performed most of the labor involved in the cultivation and gathering of food. Although root crops, beans, and squashes supplemented the Taíno diet, yuca (manioc) was the staple food. After grating and straining to remove its poisonous juices, this nutritious tuber was mixed with water and cooked into thin cakes (cazabe) like tortillas that could be filled with fish, meat, and vegetables.
    The Taíno also cultivated fruits such as guava, papaya, and pineapple, as well as beans, squash, chile peppers, tobacco, and cotton.
    Fish were abundant and were caught with bone and shell hooks, large mesh nets, and bows and arrows. Canoes, some large enough to carry one hundred people, were used for deep-sea fishing as well as for trade among the islands. Long distance travel by canoe was done from March to August, guided by the North Star and the constellations of the Milky Way.

    Archaeological excavations

    Intensive archaeological excavation of Taíno sites has unearthed many types of pottery and artefacts, confirmed Taíno burial customs, and revealed what their ancient communities looked like. Ethnologists have shed further light on Taíno daily life, myths, and ceremonies by gathering comparative data from contemporary societies with similar cultures in Venezuela and the Guianas. The Taíno legacy survives today not only in the ethnic heritage of the Caribbean people, but also in words borrowed from their language, such as barbecue, canoe, hammock, and hurricane; in customs related to ancient traditions of weaving, hunting and fishing, song and dance and in a cuisine based on yuca, beans, and barbecued meats and fish.

    Ball game - Social relationships

    In many Caribbean cultures, teams of men and women participated in a competitive ball game similar to soccer. The ball was hit with the head, arms, hips, and legs, but could not be touched with the hands except to put it into play. In the ancient Americas, there were different types of courts, and variations in rules and the sizes of teams, but the game was important to many cultures; it can be dated back to at least 3000 B.C. in Mexico. Among the Taíno, the ball game was played in the "batey", a paved court often lined with carved stones. Taíno ball games were typically held during areytos (festivals), in which communities from several federations came together to recount their joint histories and legends, and to cement their social and political relationships with singing, dancing, and feasting.

    The Taino/ Arawak people are still alive

    History books and encyclopedias still refer to the Taino/ Arawak people as the first tribe to be decimated by colonialism. It would be more appropriate to say, that this was the first tribe to be "told" they were extinct. Similar myths surround the Mayan, Aztec and other tribal nations. Because the government does not recognize them, or because they haven't maintained a very public presence, we assume that their stories ended in our grade school textbooks, saying they were conquered. While their governments and temples fell, the people remained and continued to influence our culture - and ancestry.
    In 1999, the University of Puerto Rico asked 56 volunteers with Taino Indian features to volunteer for a DNA test. Seventy percent were found to have Indo-American DNA. Later, they asked for 38 more volunteers with no known family resemblance to Taino features. Fifty-three percent had the DNA. Outside of the DNA tests, the culture of the Taino people never really disappeared and many Puerto Ricans have maintained the Taino identity over the many centuries.


    Source: http://www.en.original-people.eu.org...-indians.shtml

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    GAVIN,

    GOOD POSTING...I WAS ABOUT TO MAKE REFERENCE TO THE TAINO'S.....I RECENTLY LEARNED THAT THE INDIANS (PEOPLE) SHOWN ON THE JAMAICAN COAT OF ARMS ARE INDEED TAINO'S AS OPPOSE TO ARAWAK INDIANS...

    AND TO THINK THAT MOST OF THE TEXT BOOKS HAVE NOT BEEN CHANGED TO ACCOUNT FOR THESE RECENT (PAST 10 - 15 YEARS) DISCOVERIES...

    ADDITIONALLY, I WOULD LIKE TO POINT OUT THE SO CALLED "DISCOVERY" MADE BY COLUMBUS HAVE BEEN APPROPRIATELY RENAMED "THE ENCOUNTER"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Countryman
    GAVIN,

    GOOD POSTING...I WAS ABOUT TO MAKE REFERENCE TO THE TAINO'S.....I RECENTLY LEARNED THAT THE INDIANS (PEOPLE) SHOWN ON THE JAMAICAN COAT OF ARMS ARE INDEED TAINO'S AS OPPOSE TO ARAWAK INDIANS...
    i thought the names were interchangeable........the kids in school today are learnig about the Tainos...i first came across the name when my step daughter was doing some research bout 2-3 years ago!!!!

    what are the differences between the two???
    Smasha....never forgotten
    Get Well Soon!

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    All those years in school dem teach wi bout Arawak and now dem find out seh it wrong and a teach the younger kids bout Taino?...I was told by a friend that Arawak is a language that the indians speak and not the right name of the tribe, the name of the tribe was Taino...
    11:11-knowledge isn't filling a cup it's lighting a fire

    bun di wolf an di leopard

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    Coolie : laborer transported from the East Indies, China, or Japan, for service in some other country.

    After slavery, the white farmers were at a lost for labour. Thew went to india and China and brought over the locals. They tricked them into believeing that they were going to pay them alot of money and after five years they would return them to China and India. But placed them to lived in mud huts and wip them and payed them scraps. Coolie in its raw definition means laborer.

    Moreover, the evil white man after bringing the far easteners over called them "Bound Coolies," as you can see the term speaks for it self. A bound laborer, with no proper income and no means of providing himself with a trip back to his homeland. The Chinese who came over as indentured servants were also called coolies. But what has puzzled Ade since he was 12yrs old, is how the name stuck with the Indians.

    In my earlier days growing up, coolie was a derigatory term just like the n-word. Disenfranchized people always loose their way and end up accepting a name that was use to disresect them as a term of brotherhood and enderment.

    Hotta fyah bun all colonist and neo-imperialist for confusing many races of people.

    As for the question of arawaks there are still some left in Guyana and northern south America. The Brizilian forest is filled with native Indian Tribes who have never encountered any others other than themselves. Tons of huminitarians fight to keep it that way but lumbering is driving them out their homes. Last summer discovery magazine did a good article on it.

    One Love,
    Ade

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADE
    Coolie : laborer transported from the East Indies, China, or Japan, for service in some other country.
    After slavery, the white farmers were at a lost for labour. Thew went to india and China and brought over the locals.
    yes Ade...but haffi remember why di white man bring di coolie come..to destablize di freed Africans...dem wanted to pay us cheap & when dem saw that we would refuse & wanted di same pay dem use to pay di white people and/or white indentured servants..dem say fuck us & dem go to India & China for free/next to free labour...dats how fi dem capitalism work, dem rich offa dat & dem leave we nations poor after political emancipation

  18. #18

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    Are the Arawaks the same race/tribe as the Tainos?
    or
    were the Caribs, Tainos and Arawaks all simulatiously inhabiting JA?

    I wonder why they all walk around naked when they obviously had the ability to weave cloth to cover themselves (I guess they wanted to see exactly what they were getting into on both sides men and women.)

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    Nuff Caribs still live in St Vincent and about 90% of them live in teh same community...i remember back in the days i always use to make fun of them...telling them they're uncivilized etc etc....good people still just dont fuck with them

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    i have a little carib in mi......mix up wit a bunch of other things......dey call me d calaloo

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    Seko is offline Member needs to UPDATE email info or CONFIRM email address
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    Met a Carib once while on a vacation in St Martin. Very humble person!

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    It pleases me to see this topic posted. One day I plan to do a documentary on the Indigenous peoples of Jamaica.

    BLess!


    troddin' thru the hills with I sandals on I feet, long before power station was in creation...

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    Taino are arawak speaking people, the same way cubans are spanish speaking people but not spaniards. But the europeans just classified them as arawaks because they spoke that language. There no more tainos in jamaica they intermarried with the africans and kinda created a hybrid culture which then typically just became part of the maroon culture or the overall jamaican culture.

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