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Thread: Cerasee Tea

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    so cal
    Age
    33
    Posts
    452

    Default Cerasee Tea

    how much is too much? any side effects?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    st. louis, USA
    Posts
    17,175

    Default

    cerasee can neva be too much...

    my stash run out...send mi some nuh?

  3. #3
    mistasinista Guest

    Default

    "too much ah anyting nuh good fi yu"
    It is supposed to cleanse your system but overuse can possible do some harm to your system!
    I would probably limit intake to no more than once or twice a day(breakfast,lunch or at dinner)
    it also depends how strong you draw it!!

    Here is some info:

    This is for informational purposes only. Most of this information is
    obtained from oral and traditional sources. No medical claims are made
    here. If you have a medical problem you should see your doctor for
    treatment. As with any herb, use cautiously, and note any possible
    allergic reaction.



    General Information on -Momordica Charantia-

    Gourd family, widely used in traditional medicine in the Orient and
    Carribean. In the Orient people eat the immature fruits as a vegetable,
    and in the Phillipines, people use the young leaves as seasoning. The
    plant is also known to certain elderly African-americans of the
    southeastern US. The plant should be shared freely along with this
    information.

    Some consider Serasee to be a sacred plant and thus it should not be
    bought or sold, only given. (Something given in return may be accepted,
    however.) It should be used in its natural form; nothing should be
    isolated or synthesised from it.

    Serasee is said to have the following properties:

    Cooling in effect, bitter, blood purifier, hepatic, tonic, immune
    booster, anti-inflammatory. Used in treating infections, both local
    and systemic, arthritis, colds, flu, regulating blood pressure and
    blood sugar, wounds, burns, insect bites, stomach problems. Seeds are
    emetic.
    Description:

    Vines with square sided stems, slender, weak, creeping or climbing
    stems, musky odor. Leaves alternate, palmate, dull-green, flabby,
    with 5 to 7 toothed leaflets. Fruit 1 to 8 inches long or more,
    bright orange when ripe, oval, pointed, fleshy, splits into 3 parts
    which curl back, revealing glistening, bright-red, moist sticky arils
    (seed coating) enclosing irregularly shaped elliptic brown seeds.

    Common names and their associated cultures are: Bitterweed --
    Southeastern US; Serasee -- Carribean islands; Bitter melon -- Oriental
    immigrants to the US; Carillon -- Latin America; Mexicane -- Cajun
    "traeteur" of Louisiana, USA; Kho Qua -- Vietnam; K'u Kua -- China;
    ampalayo -- Phillipines; Kukakaya -- India. Also: Balsam Pear, Boston
    Apple, Bitter Gourd, Bitter Cucumber, Concombre Amer.

    Raw fruits and seeds contain more of the active principle than
    leaves, so caution should be taken when dealing with these. Leaves may
    be eaten raw in small quantities. A pregnant woman should not use
    momordica, as it has been used as an ingredient in some abortifacent
    mixtures. Although the plant is slightly toxic in the raw state, it is
    generally safe to use externally, and may be prepared in many ways for
    internal use.

    Serasee is primarily a preventive herb. If you have active
    diabetes or liver trouble, do not use serasee except under close
    medical supervision. Serasee inhibits sugar output in the urine, so
    some other means should be used to monitor the diabetic's condition.
    -- 2
    Serasee is believed to work in a holistic manner. It is believed
    to work best if your food and water are clean and natural, and your
    heart and mind are pure. If you eat foods with a lot of chmemicals it
    won't work so well. If you are full of toxins, use sparingly at
    first, as purification reactions may be strong. As you get used to
    serasee you may lose your taste for harmful foods and other substances
    and may desire pure, natural foods. You will probably also lose your
    craving for alchohol, drugs, refined sugar, etc. This is because
    serasee is believed to work from a very subtle level to adjust your
    body towards health.

    Any new information should be forwarded to the authors at the
    addresses listed in "Refereces" (last page). The authors are
    particularly interested in chemical analyses, recipes, anecdotes of
    treatments, experimental results, and references to this plant in
    published works. Although this plant is well known to certain non-
    western cultures, it is virtually unknown in the US and Europe.

    Uses of Mormordica

    Leaves and fruits may be picked from the plant as needed, and used
    in many ways. Leaves and fruits taken from the plant at the end of
    the season may be preserved by drying, tincture, canning, etc, for use
    when the fresh plant is not available. When taking a leaf, use a
    sharp knife or pair of scissors, and pick it as close as possible to
    the main stem without damaging the plant, as the petiole (leaf stem)
    is said to have great medicinal value. Use older, larger leaves for
    maximum potency. WHen taking a leaf, check its base; if there is a
    female flower bud at its base, do not take that leaf. The ripe
    berries may also be preserved in spirits such as rubbing alchohol,
    whiskey or vodka, and this applied to the skin. They may also be
    preserved in good vinegar, and this vinegar added to food or applied
    to the skin. Boil the leaves briefly to make a decoction. Use at
    least 5 - 7 leaves to a pint of water. The whole, green berries
    (including seeds) have also been used medicinally in severe cases. The
    crushed roots, saved from last year's harvest, are also used
    medicinally, but not much information is available at this time.
    Experiment cautiously, as the roots are very strong. Perhaps they
    could be used on the skin, either on ulcers or infected wounds, or on
    whole skin.

    A decoction of the leaves is drunk as preventative or treatment for
    many problems, such as stomachache, fever, infectious diseases,
    arthritis, hypertension, immune problems, and cancer. The decoction may
    also be used as a skin wash, or added to the bathwater. To make the
    taste of the decoction more tolorable, the leaves may be boiled with
    mint, or the decoction may be tempered with honey or mixed with fruit
    juice. Some people temper it with sugar or milk but this is not
    recommended. Oreintal peoples use the green fruits and leaves as a
    vegetable. When preparing the fruits to use as a vegetable, remove the
    seeds, as they are slightly toxic, having an emetic effect.

    Freeze the leaf-decoction in ice cube trays if available. Use the
    ice on the skin for insect bites, skin problems, chemical irritations,
    poison ivy, etc. Or, melt the decoction ice in your mouth for internal
    use.
    -- 3

    Chop the leaves finely and add to cooked meat and vegetable dishes
    during the last few minutes of cooking. They impart a mild curry-like
    taste, bitter but not unpleasantly so. This suggests an easy way to
    introduce this plant to a person who will not drink the decoction.
    Caution: Never give medicine to anyone without their knowledge or
    consent! Green berries may be sliced thin, dried, and stored for use
    when the fresh plant is not available. Reconstitute these dried berry
    slices in water and use in the same way as the fresh plant; or boil
    them for a decoction or eat them as a vegetable. The raw leaves,
    though very bitter, can be eaten, and some people can eat the raw
    immature fruits as well. Chop a leaf or two, finely, mix with other
    raw greens for salad. The arils have a sweet taste with only slight
    bitter undertones. Do no suck them directly from the seeds, however,
    since mouth enzymes may damage the seeds and make them unsuitable for
    planting. Instead, rub or wash arils from the seeds, and eat the
    arils.

    Fresh leaves, crushed and applied to insect bites or stings, are
    used to relieve itching and lessen or sometimes prevent formation of
    welts or sores. Crushed leaves may also be applied to contact rashes,
    burns, cuts, abrasions, and other wounds, to relieve pain and promote
    healing. Fresh berries, reconstituted dried berries, or berries
    perserved in tincture are also used in this way. The decoction,
    either frozen or liquid, relieves skin rashes if applied to the skin.
    A decoction of the leaves may be drunk at the onset of infectious
    diseases to lessen the course of the disease. Some people drink it
    during cold and flu epidemics as a prevention. It has been used to
    wash arthritic limbs, feverish children, and infected skin wounds.
    The decoction, taken regularly, has been used to regulate blood sugar
    and blood pressure. The arils, eaten from the mature seeds, are said
    to relieve sinus trouble. Caution: be careful in a case of active
    diabetes, as serasee masks the sugar output in the urine. Watch the
    diabetic's condition some other way.

    A decoction of the whole fruit, including seeds, has been drunk or
    used as a retention enema, despite the irritating nature of the seeds,
    in cases of severe systemic infection. This should be undertaken with
    caution, under the guidance of a knowledgable person, if possible.
    Soothing herbs or other standard remedies may be used to counteract
    the stomach distress.

    A piece of the main stem, if available, saved from last year's
    harvest, may be included in any of these decoctions.

    The roots are also said to have medicinal value, but no further
    information on this is is available at this time. Experimental
    consumption of the root should be undertaken with great caution, as
    this part of the plant is also more toxic than other parts. This
    possible use is mentioned only so that those who grow serasee would
    harvest and preserve the root as well, for when further information on
    its use becomes available. If further updates of this article are
    desired, contact the authors at the addresses listed in "references"
    on the last page.

    -- 4




    --
    Some Anecedotal Uses

    A poultice of honey and crushed leaves was applied to second-degree
    gasoline burns. The person also ate raw leaves, in small quantities,
    dipped in honey and chewed slightly. The burns healed quickly, were
    totally free of infection, and no scaring was found after healing.

    A man had been tested HIV positive and was symptomatic. He
    obtained the leaves and seeds of momordica, and was told to drink a
    decoction of the leaves, plant the seeds, tend to the plant, and use
    the plant in any way his intuition suggested. He did so, adding
    leaves to his food, and using decoctions in other ways as well.
    Several years later, he was free of most symptoms.

    A woman applied ripe serasee berries to a precancerous skin lesion,
    and the lesion dried up and was shed from her skin.

    A wasp got caught under someone's clothes, and the person was stung
    many times. Fresh crushed leaves were applied to the stings, which
    relieved the pain and prevented the formation of welts.

    Medical References

    A physician friend informs me that references to momordica
    charondia are beginning to appear in the professional journals as a
    possible treatment for AIDS. In vitro tests and experimetal
    treatments on human patients are promising. A worker at a local AIDS
    clinic has offered to send a copy of a bibliography of recent works.
    More specific information should be available in a near future
    revision of these notes.


    Planting and Horticulture Instructions for -Momordica Charantia-

    Serasee requires a long growing season; some people find it to their
    advantage to start the seeds indoors in small containers early in the
    spring. Others, living in warmer areas, find it sufficient to plant
    the seeds outdoors after the season has become warm. Serasee requires
    warm nights (65 degrees F or over) to germinate reliably. If you choose
    to start the seeds indoors, the following instructions are helpful.
    If you choose to start them outdoors, prepare an area with good soil,
    good drainage, and good light. Provide support for the vines. Plant
    and tend them in the same manner as you would cucumbers or summer
    squash.
    Starting seeds indoors

    Soak seeds in water for several days while moon is waxing or new, in
    the springtime. Prepare containers of good potting soil, well watered
    and drained. Plant seeds about 1 inch (3 cm) deep and 2 inches (6 cm)
    apart. Cover containers with cellophane and set in a warm, dark place.
    Keep soil moist but not wet. Insufficient warmth or moisture can
    inhibit germination. Nighttime temperatures should be around 65
    degrees F. Setting the arrangement atop the refrigerator may be
    sufficient; also cover with a blanket at night. There are commercial
    bottom-heaters available for germinating trays of seeds in cold
    climates; a person north of USDA zone 8 may wish to consider investing
    in one of these.

    -- 5
    When seeds sprout, remove cellophane and set near a sunny window; keep
    soil moist. When seedlings have produced 2 sets of true leaves, they
    should be transplanted to the ground, or if this is not possible,
    transplant to a large container of good soil (at most 2 or 3 plants to
    5 gallons soil).

    Some people are successful with planting the seeds directly in the
    ground, forgoing many of these procedures, but others have found that
    this gives a lower germination rate. If starting seeds outdoors, wait
    till nighttime temperatures average 65 degrees F, and plant during a
    rainy spell if possible. Keep planting bed well watered.

    Planting Outdoors

    Plant or transplant outdoors after season has become warm. Prepare a
    location with partial sun and good soil, well-watered and
    well-drained. Provide support for vines, a fence or trellis. If
    possible, no other type of vine sharing this support (otherwise
    harvest will be difficult). The plant is a tropical annual in the
    gourd family. So she needs lots of run to run, and she may need
    assistance to produce seeds if climate is insufficiently warm or
    moist. After several months, the plant will begin to produce male and
    female yellow flowers about 2-3 cm in diameter. Male flowers, more
    numerous, have a yellow center and conical base, while female flowers
    have a green center and small bump at the base. Female flowers begin
    to appear a little later than male flowers, and insufficient moisture
    can delay or prevent their appearance. Water frequently if necessary
    at this time, as serasee is an annual and female flowers are necessary
    to obtain seeds for next year's crop. When a female flower appears,
    cross pollinate by hand. One way to do this is to remove a male
    flower and gently touch its center to the center of the female flower,
    thus transferring pollen grains to center of female flower. If
    females flowers are numerous and bees are present, this procedure is
    not needed.

    Few pests plague this plant, since leaves are very bitter. If pests
    appear, control by sprinkling plant with a mixture of cayenne pepper,
    garlic powder, and water, or with a light solution of soapy water. Or
    use an infusion of tobacco or a decoction of grated onion, or a
    combination of these things. Do not use synthetic pesticides, as a
    residue may remain on the leaves, making them unsuitable for
    consumption.

    Do not disturb vines which have become attached to their supports by
    their tendrils, as this may cause the entire branch to wither.

    Throughout the growing season, you can take leaves from the plant for
    immediate use, or to preserve by freezing or drying for use when fresh
    plant is not available. Take older leaves, including petioles, in
    mid- morning after dew has dried and no rain has fallen for several
    days.

    -- 6

    Treatment of the Seed Pods

    When fruits develop, they will be soft, light green pods with a bumpy
    or irregular surface. Watch the pods till they turn completely
    orange. The stem end will be last to turn orange. Continue to watch
    it, and in a day or so more, the pod will begin to soften at the
    blossom end, and, if the weather has been good, it will begin to
    split. At this time, pick the pod. Make sure the plant is dry, no dew
    or rain. Thank the plant, then use a pair of scissors or a sharp
    knife to cut the stem holding the fruit, and take the fruit inside.
    If you don't have time to deal with it right away, keep it in the
    refrigerator.

    Wash your hands throughly, then split the pod open and remove the
    seeds. They will have bright red stuff on them. This red stuff,
    called the arils, must be removed or the seeds will not keep. There
    are several ways to remove the arils. One way is, starting at the
    point end, slip your thumbnail under the aril and remove it. Then rub
    or wash the seeds clean. The arils may be kept in water. Another way
    is to put the seeds in a small bowl of clean water, and rub them with
    your hands till the red stuff comes off. This water, into which you
    washed the arils, is very good. You can drink it for sinus trouble or
    rub it on your skin for bites, rashes, small wounds, etc. Keep it in
    the refrigerator till you're ready to use it. If you have a lot of
    pods and a lot of aril-water, freeze the water in an ice tray and
    remove one cube at a time to use.

    Still another way to remove arils, spread the seeds on a large, clean
    piece of cloth or paper and allow to dry for a few days. Then, the
    arils may be easily rubbed from the seeds. This way is easier than
    washing the arils, but it does not preserve the arils as well for use;
    a lot of the arils are wasted.

    Set the seeds aside to dry. When they are thoroughly dry, keep them in
    a clean, airtight container, protected from light and moisture, till
    next spring when they are ready to plant.

    Break the pod into several pieces, put it in a wide-mouth jar, and
    cover it with good vinegar or rubbing alchohol. SOme people use
    strong alchoholic spirits but this is not recomended. You can put all
    of your pods in one jar and use a bottle of vinegar or whatever to
    cover, or you can make up many small jars and share the with others.
    This is a sort of tincture (although it is not strained) and it is
    used for all sorts of skin problems by rubbing the liquid and
    preserved pods on the skin. If you don't have vinegar or other
    solvent handy, keep the pod in the refrigerator till you can get some.

    Another way to preserve the mature pod for future use is to cut it in
    small pieces and dry them. You can spread them out on a cookie sheet,
    "inside" side up, and place the cookie sheet on top of the stove or in
    the oven with the door open, and the warmth of the pilot light will
    dry them. Or, run a needle and thread thru them, stringing them like
    beads, and hang in a warm dry place.

    -- 7
    Save the seeds for next year's planting. Wrap them loosely in clean
    brown paper, then put the wrapped seeds in a widemouth jar with a tight
    fitting lid. Give them to others, along with copies of the latest
    version of SERASEE.TXT. Be sure and save some for yourself to plant
    next year, too. I mostly distribute seeds in the spring, as that's the
    time to plant them. If you distribute them in the fall, people tend to
    lose them, or plant them at the wrong time. If you have more seeds than
    you have people to give them to, send some to your local AIDS support
    organization, or to Of The Jungle seed co. at the address below. (For
    info on how to contact your local AIDS support organization, call the
    national AIDS hotline, 1-800-342-AIDS.) Serasee is a sacred plant, and
    should not be bought or sold. It is ok, however, to accept a donation to
    cover the cost of distribution.

    Of the methods of using products of this plant, using fresh products
    is best. Next is frozen products, then dried or preserved in tincture.

    End of the season
    In temperate climates, the plant begins to lose vigor after fall
    equinox. It will produce a large number of female flowers, and at the
    same time begin to weaken noticeably. At the time of the first frost
    it should be harvested, as it cannot survive the cold. Allow nearly
    mature fruits to ripen on the vine so that seeds can be obtained.
    (Seeds from unripe fruits are unviable). The immature fruits are
    removed and preserved by drying, canning, or other ways, or they may
    be prepared and eaten as a vegetable at this time. Remove the seeds,
    as they are emetic. Seeds from immature fruits are not viable for
    planting, but they may be preserved separately for medicinal use in
    severe cases.

    At the end of the season the vines may be pulled by the roots, removed
    from their support and spread out to dry. While doing this, remove
    leaves. Good leaves may be preserved for internal use during the
    winter; leaves which are withered or otherwise defective should not be
    used internally. To preserve immature fruits, slice thinly and dry by
    spreading on a screen or blanket or stringing loosely. They should be
    set in partial sun and protected from moisture and insects. Immature
    fruits may also be cooked and eaten fresh, canned, or preserved in
    other standard ways. Save the vines and roots for later use. The
    seeds may be planted and the cycle begin again when weather is warm,
    or at any time for indoor cultivation.

    Above USDA zone 6, many have reported difficulty germinating serasee,
    or maintaining healthy plants in an outdoor garden. In this case, one
    may wish to consider using a heated greenhouse, or growing the plant
    indoors via standard indoor gardening techniques. But be sure to
    provide lots of room!
    DANGER
    Serasee is mildly toxic when raw. There has been one reported human
    death, when an 8 year old child consumed 8 ounces of the fresh juice
    (not tea) from the leaves and stems. There have also been occaisional
    reports of illness and death in dogs who ate raw ripe fruits and seeds.
    Such poisoning is highly unlikely, however. It is quite difficult to
    consume large quantites of the raw plant parts, due to its extreme
    bitter taste. A pregnant woman should not take serasee internally, as
    it has been used in some abortifacent mixtures. Also a person with
    liver problems or diabetes should not use serasee except under close
    medical supervision. Serasee is primarily a preventive herb.
    -- 8

    Recipes for Bitter Melon

    "Bitter Melon Soup", a traditional Vietnameese recipe

    Blanche several green melons in boiling water, cut lengthwise, and
    remove seeds. Stuff with a "pate" of meat if used, or soy protein,
    onions, and seasoning herbs such as celery, parsley, etc. Tie the
    melons together with rubber bands, and return them to boiling water.
    Cook for about an hour and salt to taste. "It is very good for the
    liver", remarked the old woman who provided this recipe.

    Sauteed Bitter Melon

    Remove seeds of one or more green melons and cut in small pieces.
    Or take a handful of leaves from the bitter melon plant and chop them
    finely. Sautee along with onions, tomatoes, celery, parsley, cayenne,
    salt (if used), etc. Serve over rice, or mixed with other greens. A
    little ginger and/or molasses improves the taste.

    Other ways of preparing the immature fruits as a vegetable

    Any recipe involving summer squash or eggplant may be adapted for
    use with immature serasee fruits, commonly known as bitter melons.
    One may stuff them, use them in casseroles, etc. As always, when
    preparing bitter melons to use as a vegetable, remove the seeds.
    Although seeds from immature pods are not viable for planting, they
    may be preserved for separate medicinal use.

    Recipes can be found in Chineese cookbooks under recipes for Ku Kua
    or Bitter Melon. Many such recipes involve meat. If one does not use
    meat, tofu or reconstituted Textured Vegetable Protein may be
    substituted. If making this substitution, use extra seasoning herbs
    to taste.

    If anyone finds a good recipe for bitter melon, please forward it
    to the authors so that we can include it in future revisions of this
    work.

    The Serasee Alliance

    A Serasee Alliance is forming. This will consist of people who are
    dedicated to cultivating, studying, using, and sharing this plant. We
    will collect contact information on these people, to share with other
    people who want to use or study this plant. If you would like to have
    your name added to the Serasee Alliance, please send your name, address,
    and any personal information you want to share to Dee Smith at the
    address below. Names from this list will be passed on only to people
    who request a local contact or those who are working on similiar areas
    with Serasee. Thank you.

    -- 9
    Spiritual Aspects of Herbal Use

    Remember, when using herbs for medicine, that you are using the
    gift of the life of a sentient being. Always ask permission of the
    plant before taking of it, and always give thanks and leave an
    offering. Some people leave a coin or semiprecious stone in the
    ground, or a few drops of honey, wine, milk, tobacco, or some similar
    substance. Perhaps the bush would also appreciate an offering of
    compost, Miracle-Grow, or some other plant food. Some people cup
    their hands around the plant and meditate or pray, giving energy and
    blessings to the plant in return for its gift of life. Some people say
    that you should not take from the first plant you "talk to", but from
    others around it. Be considerate of the plant; it is a sentient
    being. Use a sharp knife or pair of scissors for taking from it, to
    minimise damage and pain to the plant. Take only what you need; not
    so much as to damage the plant.

    The best time to pick from any plant is in mid-morning, after the
    dew is dried but before the sun reaches maximum height. Except in
    cases of iimmediate need, do not pick in the evening or at night, or
    immediately after a rain, as the plant's vigor is diminished at these
    times. The best time to pick is on a waxing moon. A woman on her
    period should not handle live plants unless this is necessary, since
    her energy is very strong and unpredictable at this time and a bit of
    stray negativity can hurt the plant.

    Momordica has a very "talkative" spirit, and seems eager to
    instruct the seeker in new uses. Be open in your intuition for new
    ways to use this plant. Beware of high doses taken in a new way, as
    momordica is very strong; take it easy with new uses. This is a
    versatile plant; come to it whatever your health need is, and allow
    its spirit to suggest ways to help you. Momordica is a sentient
    being; its spirit will talk to you and resonds to whatever health
    needs you may have. Mormodica works from the subtlest levels to
    adjust you toward health, and works best with your total cooperation
    in the way of diet, attitude, etc. This is why no chemical extracts
    or synthetics should be made from momordica; such abuse would make it
    impossible for its spirit to "talk" and "work". Instead, use the
    plant in its natural state, or prepared by natural means such as teas,
    drying, tincture, ingredient in food, etc. There are many sentient
    plants like this on earth; momordica is one of them.

    If you find a new use for momordica that is particularly
    interesting, please let us know at the addresses listed in
    "references" so that we can pass this information on in future
    revisions of this work. Likewise, if future revisions are desired,
    contact the authors at these addresses.

    Right now we are in a time of rapid transition and Spirit, in Its
    mercy, has placed certain highly versitile medicine plants on earth
    for the healing of all diseases. Momordica is one of these plants.
    So always use it with gratitude to the plant and to the Higher Power,
    in whatever form you understand.

    -- 10



    References:

    -Wild Plants for Survival in South Florida- Julia F. Morton, Trend
    House, 1306 W. Kennnedy Blvd, Tampa, Fla, 1974. The botanical description
    above was taken from this work.


    -A Barefoot Doctor's Manual- The American translation of the Official
    Chineese Paramedical Manual, Running Press, 38 S Ninteenth St.,
    Philadelphia, PA 19103


    -In addition, it is packed for shipping by Emballes Par China National,
    Kwangsi, People's Republic of China.

    -Dee Smith or email Internet: fourcircles@delphi.com
    Box 1647 fourcircles@igc.apc.org
    Hopewell, VA 23860

    In the future Serasee should be available from the following seed
    companies:

    Of The Jungle, PO Box 1801, Sebastopol CA 95473. (Of The Jungle has
    agreed to distribute the seeds at a low price, covering only their
    cost of distribution.)

    Pinetree Garden Seeds (listed as Bitter Gourd) Box 300 New Gloucester,
    ME 04260

    Johnny's Selected Seeds Foss Hill Rd Albion, ME 04910-9731

    [printing note: for 80 column printing, set left margin 3, page length
    66, top margin 3. "--"'s indicate page breaks. This symbol may be
    replaced with pagefeeds (ctrl-L) if available.]


    Treatment Education Program 213.993-1482 Treatment Advocate
    AIDS Project Los Angeles 213.993-1483 Treatment Advocate
    1313 North Vine Street 213.993-1484 Program Manager
    Los Angeles, California 90028 213.993-1529 Materials
    ================================================== =========================
    T R E A T M E N T E D U C A T I O N P R O J E C T
    ================================================== =========================
    Jon Greenburg Library of Alternative Therapies for HIV/AIDS
    ================================================== =========================
    Copyright 1994, AIDS Project Los Angeles. We encourage you to share these
    fact sheets with others. Permission is granted for reproduction in full,
    and copies must be provided free of charge.
    ================================================== =========================
    The information in these fact sheets is not medical advice. It is intended
    to help people with HIV/AIDS make informed choices. Please consult with a
    physician before making any decisions regarding treatment.
    ================================================== =========================

    BITTER MELON
    Prepared by Martin A. Majchrowicz
    Spring 1994

    Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) is a plant/fruit that belongings to the
    family cucurbitacea. Chinese cucumber, the plant/fruit from which compound
    Q (a.k.a. GLQ 223 and tricosanthin) is extracted, also belongs to this
    family. Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd, bitter pear melon,
    karela, ampalaya, balsam pear, bitter apple, wild cucumber, cindeamor,
    carilla plant, African cucumber, margose, concombre African, and the herbs
    Kuguazi (China) and Karela (Pakistan), is common in Asia as well as in
    Southern California and southern Florida. This leafy plant bears fruit
    which looks like a bumpy cucumber. The fruit, seeds, leaves, flowers,
    stems, and roots of this plant have been used in Chinese medicine for
    treating gastrointestinal infections, as an appetite stimulant, to decrease
    blood sugar in diabetics, and to induce abortion in mid-term pregnancy.
    More recently, research has shown that bitter melon may be useful as
    treatment against cancer and HIV/AIDS.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION
    Researchers at the University of Hong Kong discovered alpha- and beta-
    momarchorin, two proteins that inhibit HIV. A researcher at the University
    of New York discovered another HIV-inhibitory protein, MAP 30, which has
    been shown to inhibit reverse transcriptase and p24 expression, with very
    little effect on uninfected cells. A recent report on MAP 30 has shown that
    it may also inhibit HIV through destroying viral DNA. All three of these
    proteins have been extracted from the seeds of the fruit. These and other
    proteins that have been extracted have been categorized as Ribosome-
    Inactivating Proteins (RIPs). (Ribosomes are proteins necessary for the
    replication of viruses.) Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins, which are also
    present in Compound Q (GLQ 223), have been shown to inhibit the replication
    of herpes simplex virus (HSV-l) and poliovirus. Therefore, bitter melon may
    have similar HIV-inhibitory properties to GLQ 223 but with much less
    toxicity.

    The abortion-inducing properties of bitter melon and GLQ 223 work by
    preventing the interaction of syncytial cells in the placenta. This same
    mechanism may prevent cell-to-cell infection, known as the syncytium
    formation.

    Extracts from the whole fruit have been shown to have anti-cancer
    properties in mice. The authors of this study suggest that the anti-cancer
    properties may be due in part to an enhancement of immune function induced
    by the bitter melon. Another study has shown that bitter melon extracts
    suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage and lymphocyte activity
    in mice.

    The antiviral and immune-modulating properties of bitter melon make this an
    interesting and unique approach to treating HIV/AIDS that deserves further
    research.

    STUDIES
    Unfortunately, there have been no clinical studies using bitter melon or
    any extracts. Hundreds of anecdotal stories exist about the good and the
    bad of bitter melon. The most well known is the story of a man in Los
    Angeles who began drinking bitter melon tea in 1988. Prior to starting
    bitter melon, his CD4 cells had just declined from 640 (37%) to 480 (32%)
    with minor symptoms. Several months later his CD4 cells and percentage had
    gone back up. He later switched to a bitter melon retention enema due to
    the taste of the tea. As of February 1992, his CD4 count was 1370 (38%).
    His complete blood counts and blood chemistry were all in the normal range.
    Today this man is alive, very healthy, and continuing bitter melon therapy.
    Other case histories exist which show similar results of sustained or
    increased CD4 cell counts and/or normalization of CD4/CD8 ratio. There are
    also reports that some people have experienced improved bowel movements,
    weight gain, and clearing of dermatitis. The only adverse reactions
    reported are diarrhea and fevers. However, there are those who claim they
    received no benefit from using bitter melon extracts.

    The first case history described above sparked the interest of people with
    HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles, triggering the formation of bitter melon support
    groups. The man described above lead the support group and disseminated
    information on how he administered bitter melon. One Los Angeles area
    physician agreed to follow everyone in the group but discontinued due to
    poor compliance and lack of results. Many people continue to use bitter
    melon reporting sustained CD4 cells and CD4/CD8 ratios.

    PREPARATION
    Bitter melon is available through most Filipino and/or Asian grocery
    stores, and some farmers markets. Because the plant is seasonal and is
    difficult to grow in the winter, it is sometimes sold frozen. The
    appropriate method of administering bitter melon is to make the extract
    from the fruit, vines, and leaves of the plant and either drink it as a
    juice, tea or administer it as a retention enema. Some say that drinking
    the juice or tea will result in the breakdown of the active components by
    stomach acids, therefore a retention enema would be a more efficient route.

    Therapy A: Bitter melon fruit
    -----------------------------
    1. Thoroughly wash one pound of bitter melon fruit.
    2. If using a juicer: Put fruit in juicer and save juice for drink or
    enema.
    3. If using a blender: Chop bitter melon fruit into small pieces and put
    in blender.
    4. Add sixteen ounces (two glasses) of distilled water.
    5. Blend for two minutes until liquefied.
    6. Pour mixture into strainer and squeeze pulp to obtain the maximum
    amount of liquid.
    7. Use liquid portion for drink or enema. Use within three days.

    Therapy B: Blended bitter melon leaves
    --------------------------------------
    1. Thoroughly wash leaves and vines of plant.
    2. Pick leaves from stem and put in blender until it is three-quarters
    full.
    3. Follow steps 4-7 from above.
    (If using the enema approach, you may need to dilute the liquid further by
    adding water. This mixture may be sensitive to the colon.)

    Therapy C: Boiled bitter melon leaves and stems
    -----------------------------------------------
    1. Place one and-a-half to two pounds of thoroughly cleaned bitter melon
    leaves and vines into a large pot.
    2. Add one gallon of water.
    3. After bringing to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for approximately
    thirty minutes.
    4. Remove from heat and cool.
    5. Remove leaves and vines.
    6. Save liquid portion for a tea or an enema.

    IMPORTANT NOTES
    Bitter melon drinks should not be mixed with other juices or artificial
    flavors.

    The suggested amount of drink or enema is twelve to sixteen ounces per day.
    Combinations of drink and enema can be done. Enemas can be done several
    times per day if unable to do the entire amount at one time.

    If an enema is done, it must be held inside until the liquid is completely
    absorbed. An enema bag or anal syringe can be used.

    Bitter melon fruit, leaves, or stems should always be refrigerated before
    and after processing. The boiled preparation should not be stored for
    longer than two weeks. However, the stems and leaves, as well as any juice
    prepared, can be frozen for an indefinite period of time.

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    thank you! i need to see this over and over...to remember...(i thought it was given to me once to "bring something down" it may have been something else...

    ...<3

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    I cyaan tek the bitterness...

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    i've been drinking this instead of taking root tonic. 'cause the last time i took the tonic i caught a cold instead of preventing one.

    the tea is not too bitter. think i'll just drink it once or twice a week. i was given some wood to boil with it tho which they make the tonic out of. haven't tried that yet.

    socratescerasee can neva be too much...

    my stash run out...send mi some nuh?

    ya have five dollars and some change for shipping and handling?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmpressTish View Post


    ya have five dollars and some change for shipping and handling?
    five dollars?....

    baby i'm a red boardie....that comes with certain privaliges...

    nu tek libatti...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mistasinista View Post
    "too much ah anyting nuh good fi yu"
    It is supposed to cleanse your system but overuse can possible do some harm to your system!
    I would probably limit intake to no more than once or twice a day(breakfast,lunch or at dinner)
    it also depends how strong you draw it!!

    Here is some info:



    A WHEN SINCE SERSEE GET SO MUCH WRITE UP......I REFUSE TO BUY IT (WELL NOT AGAIN SINCE THE DUTY FREE PURCHASE AT SANGSTER AIRPORT).....TOO MUCH A IT A GROW WILD PON ME LIKKLE PIECE A DIRT A YAAD.....

    ME LONG FI SOME YAH NOW
    BARBA BLACKS ->

    JERKY deh a prison. his sheep are lost in the gideon looking for a new shepherd to lead them. looks like them a follow the dunce foolish liad NOOK HAND DAVE

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    A WHEN SINCE SERSEE GET SO MUCH WRITE UP......I REFUSE TO BUY IT (WELL NOT AGAIN SINCE THE DUTY FREE PURCHASE AT SANGSTER AIRPORT).....TOO MUCH A IT A GROW WILD PON ME LIKKLE PIECE A DIRT A YAAD.....

    ME LONG FI SOME YAH NOW

    Ah nuh JAMDUNG alone hab up sersee eeh nuh,it deh all bout,but dem call it odda name!!
    Ah tru nuff place ah yaad hab it ah grow wild an nuh baddy nah too deal wid it!
    __________________

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    Yow mi have de one from the bush and a de bitterest ting since molasses.
    Mi no drink it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cocoa View Post
    Yow mi have de one from the bush and a de bitterest ting since molasses.
    Mi no drink it.

    sen it gimmi...

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    Quote Originally Posted by socrates View Post
    five dollars?....

    baby i'm a red boardie....that comes with certain privaliges...

    nu tek libatti...
    aight.

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    I drink it every now and tehn to bitter my blood.....to cleanse the impurities from it. Not sure if it actually works, but that is what I grew up hearing and doing.

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    I drink it every now and tehn to bitter my blood.....to cleanse the impurities from it. Not sure if it actually works, but that is what I grew up hearing and doing.
    I grew up hearing the same thing and i believe it because most of my older relatives grow up on bush(not to president) and herbal remedies and they are still strong and healthy!!
    If you really think about it all the medicine doctors are prescribing most if not all come from simple everyday herbs blended with other substances,who knows maybe some people have lifesaving herbs in their back yards and unknowingly pull them up thinking they are just weeds


    Yow mi have de one from the bush and a de bitterest ting since molasses.
    Mi no drink it.


    Molasses is bitter to you??

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    The older I get, the more I have started to rely on herbs I had as a child....getting back to the basics. It seems my mind and body was much stronger then, than it is now. Been poisoned by all the medications and foods I been eating over the past 10 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mistasinista View Post
    Molasses is bitter to you??


    Quote Originally Posted by socrates View Post
    sen it gimmi...
    Westurn Union alright?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Surprize View Post
    I cyaan tek the bitterness...





    you think you alone?

    but I'm going to start drinking it once a week now

    I AM LIVING LIFE
    WHAT HAVE YOU DONE LATELY?

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    sursey inna di morning every mornig- if ah nuh dat ah busy----caan wrong wid dat

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    cerassie good fi purge u blood..............

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    I've been used to mint tea so the first time I had cerasee tea I wanted to

    it did so bitter mi face did look like prune how I screw it up

    but I guess after a while it takes some getting used to
    Last edited by Mz Twizzla; 08-31-2007 at 02:31 PM.

    I AM LIVING LIFE
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    My father drink it wid no sugar str8 yuck, I dont drink it unless my stomache is hurting badly

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    [quote=scorpioprincess;2163923]My father drink it wid no sugar str8

    a so cerassie fi drink bitter so it purge u blood .................... balance out the amount a sweet drinks uno a drink............

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    Long for a cup too yes.........

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    Quote Originally Posted by ole' veteran View Post


    A WHEN SINCE SERSEE GET SO MUCH WRITE UP......I REFUSE TO BUY IT (WELL NOT AGAIN SINCE THE DUTY FREE PURCHASE AT SANGSTER AIRPORT).....TOO MUCH A IT A GROW WILD PON ME LIKKLE PIECE A DIRT A YAAD.....

    ME LONG FI SOME YAH NOW
    so ummm
    with that sed
    mi a reach miami october
    yaaa coem fa?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mistasinista View Post
    "too much ah anyting nuh good fi yu"
    It is supposed to cleanse your system but overuse can possible do some harm to your system!
    I would probably limit intake to no more than once or twice a day(breakfast,lunch or at dinner)
    it also depends how strong you draw it!!

    Here is some info:

    This is for informational purposes only. Most of this information is
    obtained from oral and traditional sources. No medical claims are made
    here. If you have a medical problem you should see your doctor for
    treatment. As with any herb, use cautiously, and note any possible
    allergic reaction.



    General Information on -Momordica Charantia-

    Gourd family, widely used in traditional medicine in the Orient and
    Carribean. In the Orient people eat the immature fruits as a vegetable,
    and in the Phillipines, people use the young leaves as seasoning. The
    plant is also known to certain elderly African-americans of the
    southeastern US. The plant should be shared freely along with this
    information.

    Some consider Serasee to be a sacred plant and thus it should not be
    bought or sold, only given. (Something given in return may be accepted,
    however.) It should be used in its natural form; nothing should be
    isolated or synthesised from it.

    Serasee is said to have the following properties:

    Cooling in effect, bitter, blood purifier, hepatic, tonic, immune
    booster, anti-inflammatory. Used in treating infections, both local
    and systemic, arthritis, colds, flu, regulating blood pressure and
    blood sugar, wounds, burns, insect bites, stomach problems. Seeds are
    emetic.
    Description:

    Vines with square sided stems, slender, weak, creeping or climbing
    stems, musky odor. Leaves alternate, palmate, dull-green, flabby,
    with 5 to 7 toothed leaflets. Fruit 1 to 8 inches long or more,
    bright orange when ripe, oval, pointed, fleshy, splits into 3 parts
    which curl back, revealing glistening, bright-red, moist sticky arils
    (seed coating) enclosing irregularly shaped elliptic brown seeds.

    Common names and their associated cultures are: Bitterweed --
    Southeastern US; Serasee -- Carribean islands; Bitter melon -- Oriental
    immigrants to the US; Carillon -- Latin America; Mexicane -- Cajun
    "traeteur" of Louisiana, USA; Kho Qua -- Vietnam; K'u Kua -- China;
    ampalayo -- Phillipines; Kukakaya -- India. Also: Balsam Pear, Boston
    Apple, Bitter Gourd, Bitter Cucumber, Concombre Amer.

    Raw fruits and seeds contain more of the active principle than
    leaves, so caution should be taken when dealing with these. Leaves may
    be eaten raw in small quantities. A pregnant woman should not use
    momordica, as it has been used as an ingredient in some abortifacent
    mixtures. Although the plant is slightly toxic in the raw state, it is
    generally safe to use externally, and may be prepared in many ways for
    internal use.

    Serasee is primarily a preventive herb. If you have active
    diabetes or liver trouble, do not use serasee except under close
    medical supervision. Serasee inhibits sugar output in the urine, so
    some other means should be used to monitor the diabetic's condition.
    -- 2
    Serasee is believed to work in a holistic manner. It is believed
    to work best if your food and water are clean and natural, and your
    heart and mind are pure. If you eat foods with a lot of chmemicals it
    won't work so well. If you are full of toxins, use sparingly at
    first, as purification reactions may be strong. As you get used to
    serasee you may lose your taste for harmful foods and other substances
    and may desire pure, natural foods. You will probably also lose your
    craving for alchohol, drugs, refined sugar, etc. This is because
    serasee is believed to work from a very subtle level to adjust your
    body towards health.

    Any new information should be forwarded to the authors at the
    addresses listed in "Refereces" (last page). The authors are
    particularly interested in chemical analyses, recipes, anecdotes of
    treatments, experimental results, and references to this plant in
    published works. Although this plant is well known to certain non-
    western cultures, it is virtually unknown in the US and Europe.

    Uses of Mormordica

    Leaves and fruits may be picked from the plant as needed, and used
    in many ways. Leaves and fruits taken from the plant at the end of
    the season may be preserved by drying, tincture, canning, etc, for use
    when the fresh plant is not available. When taking a leaf, use a
    sharp knife or pair of scissors, and pick it as close as possible to
    the main stem without damaging the plant, as the petiole (leaf stem)
    is said to have great medicinal value. Use older, larger leaves for
    maximum potency. WHen taking a leaf, check its base; if there is a
    female flower bud at its base, do not take that leaf. The ripe
    berries may also be preserved in spirits such as rubbing alchohol,
    whiskey or vodka, and this applied to the skin. They may also be
    preserved in good vinegar, and this vinegar added to food or applied
    to the skin. Boil the leaves briefly to make a decoction. Use at
    least 5 - 7 leaves to a pint of water. The whole, green berries
    (including seeds) have also been used medicinally in severe cases. The
    crushed roots, saved from last year's harvest, are also used
    medicinally, but not much information is available at this time.
    Experiment cautiously, as the roots are very strong. Perhaps they
    could be used on the skin, either on ulcers or infected wounds, or on
    whole skin.

    A decoction of the leaves is drunk as preventative or treatment for
    many problems, such as stomachache, fever, infectious diseases,
    arthritis, hypertension, immune problems, and cancer. The decoction may
    also be used as a skin wash, or added to the bathwater. To make the
    taste of the decoction more tolorable, the leaves may be boiled with
    mint, or the decoction may be tempered with honey or mixed with fruit
    juice. Some people temper it with sugar or milk but this is not
    recommended. Oreintal peoples use the green fruits and leaves as a
    vegetable. When preparing the fruits to use as a vegetable, remove the
    seeds, as they are slightly toxic, having an emetic effect.

    Freeze the leaf-decoction in ice cube trays if available. Use the
    ice on the skin for insect bites, skin problems, chemical irritations,
    poison ivy, etc. Or, melt the decoction ice in your mouth for internal
    use.
    -- 3

    Chop the leaves finely and add to cooked meat and vegetable dishes
    during the last few minutes of cooking. They impart a mild curry-like
    taste, bitter but not unpleasantly so. This suggests an easy way to
    introduce this plant to a person who will not drink the decoction.
    Caution: Never give medicine to anyone without their knowledge or
    consent! Green berries may be sliced thin, dried, and stored for use
    when the fresh plant is not available. Reconstitute these dried berry
    slices in water and use in the same way as the fresh plant; or boil
    them for a decoction or eat them as a vegetable. The raw leaves,
    though very bitter, can be eaten, and some people can eat the raw
    immature fruits as well. Chop a leaf or two, finely, mix with other
    raw greens for salad. The arils have a sweet taste with only slight
    bitter undertones. Do no suck them directly from the seeds, however,
    since mouth enzymes may damage the seeds and make them unsuitable for
    planting. Instead, rub or wash arils from the seeds, and eat the
    arils.

    Fresh leaves, crushed and applied to insect bites or stings, are
    used to relieve itching and lessen or sometimes prevent formation of
    welts or sores. Crushed leaves may also be applied to contact rashes,
    burns, cuts, abrasions, and other wounds, to relieve pain and promote
    healing. Fresh berries, reconstituted dried berries, or berries
    perserved in tincture are also used in this way. The decoction,
    either frozen or liquid, relieves skin rashes if applied to the skin.
    A decoction of the leaves may be drunk at the onset of infectious
    diseases to lessen the course of the disease. Some people drink it
    during cold and flu epidemics as a prevention. It has been used to
    wash arthritic limbs, feverish children, and infected skin wounds.
    The decoction, taken regularly, has been used to regulate blood sugar
    and blood pressure. The arils, eaten from the mature seeds, are said
    to relieve sinus trouble. Caution: be careful in a case of active
    diabetes, as serasee masks the sugar output in the urine. Watch the
    diabetic's condition some other way.

    A decoction of the whole fruit, including seeds, has been drunk or
    used as a retention enema, despite the irritating nature of the seeds,
    in cases of severe systemic infection. This should be undertaken with
    caution, under the guidance of a knowledgable person, if possible.
    Soothing herbs or other standard remedies may be used to counteract
    the stomach distress.

    A piece of the main stem, if available, saved from last year's
    harvest, may be included in any of these decoctions.

    The roots are also said to have medicinal value, but no further
    information on this is is available at this time. Experimental
    consumption of the root should be undertaken with great caution, as
    this part of the plant is also more toxic than other parts. This
    possible use is mentioned only so that those who grow serasee would
    harvest and preserve the root as well, for when further information on
    its use becomes available. If further updates of this article are
    desired, contact the authors at the addresses listed in "references"
    on the last page.

    -- 4




    --
    Some Anecedotal Uses

    A poultice of honey and crushed leaves was applied to second-degree
    gasoline burns. The person also ate raw leaves, in small quantities,
    dipped in honey and chewed slightly. The burns healed quickly, were
    totally free of infection, and no scaring was found after healing.

    A man had been tested HIV positive and was symptomatic. He
    obtained the leaves and seeds of momordica, and was told to drink a
    decoction of the leaves, plant the seeds, tend to the plant, and use
    the plant in any way his intuition suggested. He did so, adding
    leaves to his food, and using decoctions in other ways as well.
    Several years later, he was free of most symptoms.

    A woman applied ripe serasee berries to a precancerous skin lesion,
    and the lesion dried up and was shed from her skin.

    A wasp got caught under someone's clothes, and the person was stung
    many times. Fresh crushed leaves were applied to the stings, which
    relieved the pain and prevented the formation of welts.

    Medical References

    A physician friend informs me that references to momordica
    charondia are beginning to appear in the professional journals as a
    possible treatment for AIDS. In vitro tests and experimetal
    treatments on human patients are promising. A worker at a local AIDS
    clinic has offered to send a copy of a bibliography of recent works.
    More specific information should be available in a near future
    revision of these notes.


    Planting and Horticulture Instructions for -Momordica Charantia-

    Serasee requires a long growing season; some people find it to their
    advantage to start the seeds indoors in small containers early in the
    spring. Others, living in warmer areas, find it sufficient to plant
    the seeds outdoors after the season has become warm. Serasee requires
    warm nights (65 degrees F or over) to germinate reliably. If you choose
    to start the seeds indoors, the following instructions are helpful.
    If you choose to start them outdoors, prepare an area with good soil,
    good drainage, and good light. Provide support for the vines. Plant
    and tend them in the same manner as you would cucumbers or summer
    squash.
    Starting seeds indoors

    Soak seeds in water for several days while moon is waxing or new, in
    the springtime. Prepare containers of good potting soil, well watered
    and drained. Plant seeds about 1 inch (3 cm) deep and 2 inches (6 cm)
    apart. Cover containers with cellophane and set in a warm, dark place.
    Keep soil moist but not wet. Insufficient warmth or moisture can
    inhibit germination. Nighttime temperatures should be around 65
    degrees F. Setting the arrangement atop the refrigerator may be
    sufficient; also cover with a blanket at night. There are commercial
    bottom-heaters available for germinating trays of seeds in cold
    climates; a person north of USDA zone 8 may wish to consider investing
    in one of these.

    -- 5
    When seeds sprout, remove cellophane and set near a sunny window; keep
    soil moist. When seedlings have produced 2 sets of true leaves, they
    should be transplanted to the ground, or if this is not possible,
    transplant to a large container of good soil (at most 2 or 3 plants to
    5 gallons soil).

    Some people are successful with planting the seeds directly in the
    ground, forgoing many of these procedures, but others have found that
    this gives a lower germination rate. If starting seeds outdoors, wait
    till nighttime temperatures average 65 degrees F, and plant during a
    rainy spell if possible. Keep planting bed well watered.

    Planting Outdoors

    Plant or transplant outdoors after season has become warm. Prepare a
    location with partial sun and good soil, well-watered and
    well-drained. Provide support for vines, a fence or trellis. If
    possible, no other type of vine sharing this support (otherwise
    harvest will be difficult). The plant is a tropical annual in the
    gourd family. So she needs lots of run to run, and she may need
    assistance to produce seeds if climate is insufficiently warm or
    moist. After several months, the plant will begin to produce male and
    female yellow flowers about 2-3 cm in diameter. Male flowers, more
    numerous, have a yellow center and conical base, while female flowers
    have a green center and small bump at the base. Female flowers begin
    to appear a little later than male flowers, and insufficient moisture
    can delay or prevent their appearance. Water frequently if necessary
    at this time, as serasee is an annual and female flowers are necessary
    to obtain seeds for next year's crop. When a female flower appears,
    cross pollinate by hand. One way to do this is to remove a male
    flower and gently touch its center to the center of the female flower,
    thus transferring pollen grains to center of female flower. If
    females flowers are numerous and bees are present, this procedure is
    not needed.

    Few pests plague this plant, since leaves are very bitter. If pests
    appear, control by sprinkling plant with a mixture of cayenne pepper,
    garlic powder, and water, or with a light solution of soapy water. Or
    use an infusion of tobacco or a decoction of grated onion, or a
    combination of these things. Do not use synthetic pesticides, as a
    residue may remain on the leaves, making them unsuitable for
    consumption.

    Do not disturb vines which have become attached to their supports by
    their tendrils, as this may cause the entire branch to wither.

    Throughout the growing season, you can take leaves from the plant for
    immediate use, or to preserve by freezing or drying for use when fresh
    plant is not available. Take older leaves, including petioles, in
    mid- morning after dew has dried and no rain has fallen for several
    days.

    -- 6

    Treatment of the Seed Pods

    When fruits develop, they will be soft, light green pods with a bumpy
    or irregular surface. Watch the pods till they turn completely
    orange. The stem end will be last to turn orange. Continue to watch
    it, and in a day or so more, the pod will begin to soften at the
    blossom end, and, if the weather has been good, it will begin to
    split. At this time, pick the pod. Make sure the plant is dry, no dew
    or rain. Thank the plant, then use a pair of scissors or a sharp
    knife to cut the stem holding the fruit, and take the fruit inside.
    If you don't have time to deal with it right away, keep it in the
    refrigerator.

    Wash your hands throughly, then split the pod open and remove the
    seeds. They will have bright red stuff on them. This red stuff,
    called the arils, must be removed or the seeds will not keep. There
    are several ways to remove the arils. One way is, starting at the
    point end, slip your thumbnail under the aril and remove it. Then rub
    or wash the seeds clean. The arils may be kept in water. Another way
    is to put the seeds in a small bowl of clean water, and rub them with
    your hands till the red stuff comes off. This water, into which you
    washed the arils, is very good. You can drink it for sinus trouble or
    rub it on your skin for bites, rashes, small wounds, etc. Keep it in
    the refrigerator till you're ready to use it. If you have a lot of
    pods and a lot of aril-water, freeze the water in an ice tray and
    remove one cube at a time to use.

    Still another way to remove arils, spread the seeds on a large, clean
    piece of cloth or paper and allow to dry for a few days. Then, the
    arils may be easily rubbed from the seeds. This way is easier than
    washing the arils, but it does not preserve the arils as well for use;
    a lot of the arils are wasted.

    Set the seeds aside to dry. When they are thoroughly dry, keep them in
    a clean, airtight container, protected from light and moisture, till
    next spring when they are ready to plant.

    Break the pod into several pieces, put it in a wide-mouth jar, and
    cover it with good vinegar or rubbing alchohol. SOme people use
    strong alchoholic spirits but this is not recomended. You can put all
    of your pods in one jar and use a bottle of vinegar or whatever to
    cover, or you can make up many small jars and share the with others.
    This is a sort of tincture (although it is not strained) and it is
    used for all sorts of skin problems by rubbing the liquid and
    preserved pods on the skin. If you don't have vinegar or other
    solvent handy, keep the pod in the refrigerator till you can get some.

    Another way to preserve the mature pod for future use is to cut it in
    small pieces and dry them. You can spread them out on a cookie sheet,
    "inside" side up, and place the cookie sheet on top of the stove or in
    the oven with the door open, and the warmth of the pilot light will
    dry them. Or, run a needle and thread thru them, stringing them like
    beads, and hang in a warm dry place.

    -- 7
    Save the seeds for next year's planting. Wrap them loosely in clean
    brown paper, then put the wrapped seeds in a widemouth jar with a tight
    fitting lid. Give them to others, along with copies of the latest
    version of SERASEE.TXT. Be sure and save some for yourself to plant
    next year, too. I mostly distribute seeds in the spring, as that's the
    time to plant them. If you distribute them in the fall, people tend to
    lose them, or plant them at the wrong time. If you have more seeds than
    you have people to give them to, send some to your local AIDS support
    organization, or to Of The Jungle seed co. at the address below. (For
    info on how to contact your local AIDS support organization, call the
    national AIDS hotline, 1-800-342-AIDS.) Serasee is a sacred plant, and
    should not be bought or sold. It is ok, however, to accept a donation to
    cover the cost of distribution.

    Of the methods of using products of this plant, using fresh products
    is best. Next is frozen products, then dried or preserved in tincture.

    End of the season
    In temperate climates, the plant begins to lose vigor after fall
    equinox. It will produce a large number of female flowers, and at the
    same time begin to weaken noticeably. At the time of the first frost
    it should be harvested, as it cannot survive the cold. Allow nearly
    mature fruits to ripen on the vine so that seeds can be obtained.
    (Seeds from unripe fruits are unviable). The immature fruits are
    removed and preserved by drying, canning, or other ways, or they may
    be prepared and eaten as a vegetable at this time. Remove the seeds,
    as they are emetic. Seeds from immature fruits are not viable for
    planting, but they may be preserved separately for medicinal use in
    severe cases.

    At the end of the season the vines may be pulled by the roots, removed
    from their support and spread out to dry. While doing this, remove
    leaves. Good leaves may be preserved for internal use during the
    winter; leaves which are withered or otherwise defective should not be
    used internally. To preserve immature fruits, slice thinly and dry by
    spreading on a screen or blanket or stringing loosely. They should be
    set in partial sun and protected from moisture and insects. Immature
    fruits may also be cooked and eaten fresh, canned, or preserved in
    other standard ways. Save the vines and roots for later use. The
    seeds may be planted and the cycle begin again when weather is warm,
    or at any time for indoor cultivation.

    Above USDA zone 6, many have reported difficulty germinating serasee,
    or maintaining healthy plants in an outdoor garden. In this case, one
    may wish to consider using a heated greenhouse, or growing the plant
    indoors via standard indoor gardening techniques. But be sure to
    provide lots of room!
    DANGER
    Serasee is mildly toxic when raw. There has been one reported human
    death, when an 8 year old child consumed 8 ounces of the fresh juice
    (not tea) from the leaves and stems. There have also been occaisional
    reports of illness and death in dogs who ate raw ripe fruits and seeds.
    Such poisoning is highly unlikely, however. It is quite difficult to
    consume large quantites of the raw plant parts, due to its extreme
    bitter taste. A pregnant woman should not take serasee internally, as
    it has been used in some abortifacent mixtures. Also a person with
    liver problems or diabetes should not use serasee except under close
    medical supervision. Serasee is primarily a preventive herb.
    -- 8

    Recipes for Bitter Melon

    "Bitter Melon Soup", a traditional Vietnameese recipe

    Blanche several green melons in boiling water, cut lengthwise, and
    remove seeds. Stuff with a "pate" of meat if used, or soy protein,
    onions, and seasoning herbs such as celery, parsley, etc. Tie the
    melons together with rubber bands, and return them to boiling water.
    Cook for about an hour and salt to taste. "It is very good for the
    liver", remarked the old woman who provided this recipe.

    Sauteed Bitter Melon

    Remove seeds of one or more green melons and cut in small pieces.
    Or take a handful of leaves from the bitter melon plant and chop them
    finely. Sautee along with onions, tomatoes, celery, parsley, cayenne,
    salt (if used), etc. Serve over rice, or mixed with other greens. A
    little ginger and/or molasses improves the taste.

    Other ways of preparing the immature fruits as a vegetable

    Any recipe involving summer squash or eggplant may be adapted for
    use with immature serasee fruits, commonly known as bitter melons.
    One may stuff them, use them in casseroles, etc. As always, when
    preparing bitter melons to use as a vegetable, remove the seeds.
    Although seeds from immature pods are not viable for planting, they
    may be preserved for separate medicinal use.

    Recipes can be found in Chineese cookbooks under recipes for Ku Kua
    or Bitter Melon. Many such recipes involve meat. If one does not use
    meat, tofu or reconstituted Textured Vegetable Protein may be
    substituted. If making this substitution, use extra seasoning herbs
    to taste.

    If anyone finds a good recipe for bitter melon, please forward it
    to the authors so that we can include it in future revisions of this
    work.

    The Serasee Alliance

    A Serasee Alliance is forming. This will consist of people who are
    dedicated to cultivating, studying, using, and sharing this plant. We
    will collect contact information on these people, to share with other
    people who want to use or study this plant. If you would like to have
    your name added to the Serasee Alliance, please send your name, address,
    and any personal information you want to share to Dee Smith at the
    address below. Names from this list will be passed on only to people
    who request a local contact or those who are working on similiar areas
    with Serasee. Thank you.

    -- 9
    Spiritual Aspects of Herbal Use

    Remember, when using herbs for medicine, that you are using the
    gift of the life of a sentient being. Always ask permission of the
    plant before taking of it, and always give thanks and leave an
    offering. Some people leave a coin or semiprecious stone in the
    ground, or a few drops of honey, wine, milk, tobacco, or some similar
    substance. Perhaps the bush would also appreciate an offering of
    compost, Miracle-Grow, or some other plant food. Some people cup
    their hands around the plant and meditate or pray, giving energy and
    blessings to the plant in return for its gift of life. Some people say
    that you should not take from the first plant you "talk to", but from
    others around it. Be considerate of the plant; it is a sentient
    being. Use a sharp knife or pair of scissors for taking from it, to
    minimise damage and pain to the plant. Take only what you need; not
    so much as to damage the plant.

    The best time to pick from any plant is in mid-morning, after the
    dew is dried but before the sun reaches maximum height. Except in
    cases of iimmediate need, do not pick in the evening or at night, or
    immediately after a rain, as the plant's vigor is diminished at these
    times. The best time to pick is on a waxing moon. A woman on her
    period should not handle live plants unless this is necessary, since
    her energy is very strong and unpredictable at this time and a bit of
    stray negativity can hurt the plant.

    Momordica has a very "talkative" spirit, and seems eager to
    instruct the seeker in new uses. Be open in your intuition for new
    ways to use this plant. Beware of high doses taken in a new way, as
    momordica is very strong; take it easy with new uses. This is a
    versatile plant; come to it whatever your health need is, and allow
    its spirit to suggest ways to help you. Momordica is a sentient
    being; its spirit will talk to you and resonds to whatever health
    needs you may have. Mormodica works from the subtlest levels to
    adjust you toward health, and works best with your total cooperation
    in the way of diet, attitude, etc. This is why no chemical extracts
    or synthetics should be made from momordica; such abuse would make it
    impossible for its spirit to "talk" and "work". Instead, use the
    plant in its natural state, or prepared by natural means such as teas,
    drying, tincture, ingredient in food, etc. There are many sentient
    plants like this on earth; momordica is one of them.

    If you find a new use for momordica that is particularly
    interesting, please let us know at the addresses listed in
    "references" so that we can pass this information on in future
    revisions of this work. Likewise, if future revisions are desired,
    contact the authors at these addresses.

    Right now we are in a time of rapid transition and Spirit, in Its
    mercy, has placed certain highly versitile medicine plants on earth
    for the healing of all diseases. Momordica is one of these plants.
    So always use it with gratitude to the plant and to the Higher Power,
    in whatever form you understand.

    -- 10



    References:

    -Wild Plants for Survival in South Florida- Julia F. Morton, Trend
    House, 1306 W. Kennnedy Blvd, Tampa, Fla, 1974. The botanical description
    above was taken from this work.


    -A Barefoot Doctor's Manual- The American translation of the Official
    Chineese Paramedical Manual, Running Press, 38 S Ninteenth St.,
    Philadelphia, PA 19103


    -In addition, it is packed for shipping by Emballes Par China National,
    Kwangsi, People's Republic of China.

    -Dee Smith or email Internet: fourcircles@delphi.com
    Box 1647 fourcircles@igc.apc.org
    Hopewell, VA 23860

    In the future Serasee should be available from the following seed
    companies:

    Of The Jungle, PO Box 1801, Sebastopol CA 95473. (Of The Jungle has
    agreed to distribute the seeds at a low price, covering only their
    cost of distribution.)

    Pinetree Garden Seeds (listed as Bitter Gourd) Box 300 New Gloucester,
    ME 04260

    Johnny's Selected Seeds Foss Hill Rd Albion, ME 04910-9731

    [printing note: for 80 column printing, set left margin 3, page length
    66, top margin 3. "--"'s indicate page breaks. This symbol may be
    replaced with pagefeeds (ctrl-L) if available.]


    Treatment Education Program 213.993-1482 Treatment Advocate
    AIDS Project Los Angeles 213.993-1483 Treatment Advocate
    1313 North Vine Street 213.993-1484 Program Manager
    Los Angeles, California 90028 213.993-1529 Materials
    ================================================== =========================
    T R E A T M E N T E D U C A T I O N P R O J E C T
    ================================================== =========================
    Jon Greenburg Library of Alternative Therapies for HIV/AIDS
    ================================================== =========================
    Copyright 1994, AIDS Project Los Angeles. We encourage you to share these
    fact sheets with others. Permission is granted for reproduction in full,
    and copies must be provided free of charge.
    ================================================== =========================
    The information in these fact sheets is not medical advice. It is intended
    to help people with HIV/AIDS make informed choices. Please consult with a
    physician before making any decisions regarding treatment.
    ================================================== =========================

    BITTER MELON
    Prepared by Martin A. Majchrowicz
    Spring 1994

    Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) is a plant/fruit that belongings to the
    family cucurbitacea. Chinese cucumber, the plant/fruit from which compound
    Q (a.k.a. GLQ 223 and tricosanthin) is extracted, also belongs to this
    family. Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd, bitter pear melon,
    karela, ampalaya, balsam pear, bitter apple, wild cucumber, cindeamor,
    carilla plant, African cucumber, margose, concombre African, and the herbs
    Kuguazi (China) and Karela (Pakistan), is common in Asia as well as in
    Southern California and southern Florida. This leafy plant bears fruit
    which looks like a bumpy cucumber. The fruit, seeds, leaves, flowers,
    stems, and roots of this plant have been used in Chinese medicine for
    treating gastrointestinal infections, as an appetite stimulant, to decrease
    blood sugar in diabetics, and to induce abortion in mid-term pregnancy.
    More recently, research has shown that bitter melon may be useful as
    treatment against cancer and HIV/AIDS.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION
    Researchers at the University of Hong Kong discovered alpha- and beta-
    momarchorin, two proteins that inhibit HIV. A researcher at the University
    of New York discovered another HIV-inhibitory protein, MAP 30, which has
    been shown to inhibit reverse transcriptase and p24 expression, with very
    little effect on uninfected cells. A recent report on MAP 30 has shown that
    it may also inhibit HIV through destroying viral DNA. All three of these
    proteins have been extracted from the seeds of the fruit. These and other
    proteins that have been extracted have been categorized as Ribosome-
    Inactivating Proteins (RIPs). (Ribosomes are proteins necessary for the
    replication of viruses.) Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins, which are also
    present in Compound Q (GLQ 223), have been shown to inhibit the replication
    of herpes simplex virus (HSV-l) and poliovirus. Therefore, bitter melon may
    have similar HIV-inhibitory properties to GLQ 223 but with much less
    toxicity.

    The abortion-inducing properties of bitter melon and GLQ 223 work by
    preventing the interaction of syncytial cells in the placenta. This same
    mechanism may prevent cell-to-cell infection, known as the syncytium
    formation.

    Extracts from the whole fruit have been shown to have anti-cancer
    properties in mice. The authors of this study suggest that the anti-cancer
    properties may be due in part to an enhancement of immune function induced
    by the bitter melon. Another study has shown that bitter melon extracts
    suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage and lymphocyte activity
    in mice.

    The antiviral and immune-modulating properties of bitter melon make this an
    interesting and unique approach to treating HIV/AIDS that deserves further
    research.

    STUDIES
    Unfortunately, there have been no clinical studies using bitter melon or
    any extracts. Hundreds of anecdotal stories exist about the good and the
    bad of bitter melon. The most well known is the story of a man in Los
    Angeles who began drinking bitter melon tea in 1988. Prior to starting
    bitter melon, his CD4 cells had just declined from 640 (37%) to 480 (32%)
    with minor symptoms. Several months later his CD4 cells and percentage had
    gone back up. He later switched to a bitter melon retention enema due to
    the taste of the tea. As of February 1992, his CD4 count was 1370 (38%).
    His complete blood counts and blood chemistry were all in the normal range.
    Today this man is alive, very healthy, and continuing bitter melon therapy.
    Other case histories exist which show similar results of sustained or
    increased CD4 cell counts and/or normalization of CD4/CD8 ratio. There are
    also reports that some people have experienced improved bowel movements,
    weight gain, and clearing of dermatitis. The only adverse reactions
    reported are diarrhea and fevers. However, there are those who claim they
    received no benefit from using bitter melon extracts.

    The first case history described above sparked the interest of people with
    HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles, triggering the formation of bitter melon support
    groups. The man described above lead the support group and disseminated
    information on how he administered bitter melon. One Los Angeles area
    physician agreed to follow everyone in the group but discontinued due to
    poor compliance and lack of results. Many people continue to use bitter
    melon reporting sustained CD4 cells and CD4/CD8 ratios.

    PREPARATION
    Bitter melon is available through most Filipino and/or Asian grocery
    stores, and some farmers markets. Because the plant is seasonal and is
    difficult to grow in the winter, it is sometimes sold frozen. The
    appropriate method of administering bitter melon is to make the extract
    from the fruit, vines, and leaves of the plant and either drink it as a
    juice, tea or administer it as a retention enema. Some say that drinking
    the juice or tea will result in the breakdown of the active components by
    stomach acids, therefore a retention enema would be a more efficient route.

    Therapy A: Bitter melon fruit
    -----------------------------
    1. Thoroughly wash one pound of bitter melon fruit.
    2. If using a juicer: Put fruit in juicer and save juice for drink or
    enema.
    3. If using a blender: Chop bitter melon fruit into small pieces and put
    in blender.
    4. Add sixteen ounces (two glasses) of distilled water.
    5. Blend for two minutes until liquefied.
    6. Pour mixture into strainer and squeeze pulp to obtain the maximum
    amount of liquid.
    7. Use liquid portion for drink or enema. Use within three days.

    Therapy B: Blended bitter melon leaves
    --------------------------------------
    1. Thoroughly wash leaves and vines of plant.
    2. Pick leaves from stem and put in blender until it is three-quarters
    full.
    3. Follow steps 4-7 from above.
    (If using the enema approach, you may need to dilute the liquid further by
    adding water. This mixture may be sensitive to the colon.)

    Therapy C: Boiled bitter melon leaves and stems
    -----------------------------------------------
    1. Place one and-a-half to two pounds of thoroughly cleaned bitter melon
    leaves and vines into a large pot.
    2. Add one gallon of water.
    3. After bringing to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for approximately
    thirty minutes.
    4. Remove from heat and cool.
    5. Remove leaves and vines.
    6. Save liquid portion for a tea or an enema.

    IMPORTANT NOTES
    Bitter melon drinks should not be mixed with other juices or artificial
    flavors.

    The suggested amount of drink or enema is twelve to sixteen ounces per day.
    Combinations of drink and enema can be done. Enemas can be done several
    times per day if unable to do the entire amount at one time.

    If an enema is done, it must be held inside until the liquid is completely
    absorbed. An enema bag or anal syringe can be used.

    Bitter melon fruit, leaves, or stems should always be refrigerated before
    and after processing. The boiled preparation should not be stored for
    longer than two weeks. However, the stems and leaves, as well as any juice
    prepared, can be frozen for an indefinite period of time.







    How much info yuh waan gi wi ,sah



    Tonks ,doe

    Dah someting deh toooooooooooooo bitta fimmi.Don't tink anyone willeva get use tuh it.

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